Civil War Fuck Yeah.

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January 8th, 1864.
Seventeen-year-old David O. Dodd is hanged as a Confederate spy in Little Rock, Arkansas.
David Owen Dodd was caught with sensitive documents on his trip from Union-occupied Little Rock back to his family in Camden, Arkansas. The federal army took Little Rock in September 1863 and Confederate troops retreated to the southwest of the state. David O. Dodd was called the “Boy Martyr of the Confederacy” because he refused to tell the Union authorities the source of his information.

January 8th, 1864.

Seventeen-year-old David O. Dodd is hanged as a Confederate spy in Little Rock, Arkansas.

David Owen Dodd was caught with sensitive documents on his trip from Union-occupied Little Rock back to his family in Camden, Arkansas. The federal army took Little Rock in September 1863 and Confederate troops retreated to the southwest of the state. David O. Dodd was called the “Boy Martyr of the Confederacy” because he refused to tell the Union authorities the source of his information.

January 8th, 1864.
Gen. John Hunt Morgan had been captured in July 1863 during a failed raid into Ohio, and imprisoned there. In January 1864 he escaped from prison in a characteristically dashing way, and made his way back to the South.
The Richmond Daily Dispatch reports on Morgan’s escape from the North, and his planned welcome in Richmond.
Gen. John H. Morgan’s escape.
A dispatch from Chattanooga gives the following particulars about Morgan’s escape:
The bold bandit whose hair mildewed in the Columbus penitentiary during the latter part of the summer and through the autumn, has at last reached a place of safety within the rebel lines. He crossed the Tennessee river at White Creek Shoals, sixty miles above here, last Sunday morning. Staunch friends have aided him all the way from the prison door in Ohio. Reaching the foot of the Cumberland Mountain, eight miles from the mouth of White Creek, he impressed all the inhabitants, seized such tools as he needed, and proceeded with his escort of forty men to the bank of the Tennessee, one mile below Gillespie’s Landing, taking care that none of the citizens who saw him should escape to give the alarm to the men on videttes at Kingston. An old man who had been seized managed to elude the vigilance of John’s guards, and traveled on foot to Gillespie with the exciting intelligence. Infantry being the only available troops at Gillespie, they were hurried off to White Creek Shoals, with a view to intercept the guerilla chief, but they arrived a few moments too late. Morgan himself, mounted on a five-thousand- dollar stallion, presented him in Kentucky, and accompanied by one mounted man of his escort, dashed away just as the panting foot soldiers came in sight.–Two of his Captains — Robert and Wm. Cummings, of Lexington, Ky.–were not so successful, and were taken, together with fifteen of the rebel troopers who had lost their horses in the stream.–Intelligence was sent to Gen. Howard, at Athens, who attempted to arrest the bold johnny, but without success. A male cousin of Abraham Lincoln’s, who resides near White Creek Shoals, was active in assisting the flying chief. Morgan will undoubtedly have some important cavalry command, although I do not see at present where his troopers are to come from unless he supercedes Forrest.
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Arrival of Gen. Morgan.
–Gen. Morgan arrived in the city last night. He proceeded from the cars to the Balard House, where rooms have been prepared for his reception. To day at noon he will be formally welcomed at the City Hall.

January 8th, 1864.

Gen. John Hunt Morgan had been captured in July 1863 during a failed raid into Ohio, and imprisoned there. In January 1864 he escaped from prison in a characteristically dashing way, and made his way back to the South.

The Richmond Daily Dispatch reports on Morgan’s escape from the North, and his planned welcome in Richmond.

Gen. John H. Morgan’s escape.

A dispatch from Chattanooga gives the following particulars about Morgan’s escape:

The bold bandit whose hair mildewed in the Columbus penitentiary during the latter part of the summer and through the autumn, has at last reached a place of safety within the rebel lines. He crossed the Tennessee river at White Creek Shoals, sixty miles above here, last Sunday morning. Staunch friends have aided him all the way from the prison door in Ohio. Reaching the foot of the Cumberland Mountain, eight miles from the mouth of White Creek, he impressed all the inhabitants, seized such tools as he needed, and proceeded with his escort of forty men to the bank of the Tennessee, one mile below Gillespie’s Landing, taking care that none of the citizens who saw him should escape to give the alarm to the men on videttes at Kingston. An old man who had been seized managed to elude the vigilance of John’s guards, and traveled on foot to Gillespie with the exciting intelligence. Infantry being the only available troops at Gillespie, they were hurried off to White Creek Shoals, with a view to intercept the guerilla chief, but they arrived a few moments too late. Morgan himself, mounted on a five-thousand- dollar stallion, presented him in Kentucky, and accompanied by one mounted man of his escort, dashed away just as the panting foot soldiers came in sight.–Two of his Captains — Robert and Wm. Cummings, of Lexington, Ky.–were not so successful, and were taken, together with fifteen of the rebel troopers who had lost their horses in the stream.–Intelligence was sent to Gen. Howard, at Athens, who attempted to arrest the bold johnny, but without success. A male cousin of Abraham Lincoln’s, who resides near White Creek Shoals, was active in assisting the flying chief. Morgan will undoubtedly have some important cavalry command, although I do not see at present where his troopers are to come from unless he supercedes Forrest.

**************************************

Arrival of Gen. Morgan.

–Gen. Morgan arrived in the city last night. He proceeded from the cars to the Balard House, where rooms have been prepared for his reception. To day at noon he will be formally welcomed at the City Hall.

January 7th, 1864.
Caleb Blood Smith a member of Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet died January 7th 1864.Caleb Blood Smith was born April 16th 1808 in Boston Massachusetts. His parents moved the family to Ohio in 1815. Smith attended Cincinnati and Miami University, and than studied law, being admitted to the bar in 1828. He started the paper “The Sentinel” in 1832. After serving several terms in the Indiana Legislature, Smith was elected to the US Congress in 1843-1849 as a member of the Whig party. President Zachary Taylor appointed him to investigate claims made by Americans against Mexico. Smith returned in 1850 to Cincinnati and the practice of law.President Abraham Lincoln appointed Smith in 1861 to be the United States Secretary of the Interior. Smith was the first resident of Indiana to hold a Presidential Cabinet position. However due to health issues, Smith let most the responsibilities of his jobs fall to his Assistant Secretary John Palmer Usher. In 1862 Smith temporarily filled the empty sear on the Supreme Court, left vacant by John Archibald Campbell, however Lincoln nominated David Davis to fill the position. Smith resigned in December 1862 do to differences in political oppion, and went back to Indiana where he served as a United States circuit judge.Smith died January 7th 1864 in Indianapolis Indiana. He is believed to have been buried in the City Cemetery in Connersville Indiana. For two days after his death government building were draped in black by order of the President.

January 7th, 1864.

Caleb Blood Smith a member of Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet died January 7th 1864.

Caleb Blood Smith was born April 16th 1808 in Boston Massachusetts. His parents moved the family to Ohio in 1815. Smith attended Cincinnati and Miami University, and than studied law, being admitted to the bar in 1828. He started the paper “The Sentinel” in 1832. After serving several terms in the Indiana Legislature, Smith was elected to the US Congress in 1843-1849 as a member of the Whig party. President Zachary Taylor appointed him to investigate claims made by Americans against Mexico. Smith returned in 1850 to Cincinnati and the practice of law.

President Abraham Lincoln appointed Smith in 1861 to be the United States Secretary of the Interior. Smith was the first resident of Indiana to hold a Presidential Cabinet position. However due to health issues, Smith let most the responsibilities of his jobs fall to his Assistant Secretary John Palmer Usher. In 1862 Smith temporarily filled the empty sear on the Supreme Court, left vacant by John Archibald Campbell, however Lincoln nominated David Davis to fill the position. Smith resigned in December 1862 do to differences in political oppion, and went back to Indiana where he served as a United States circuit judge.

Smith died January 7th 1864 in Indianapolis Indiana. He is believed to have been buried in the City Cemetery in Connersville Indiana. For two days after his death government building were draped in black by order of the President.

1864.
Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan and his generals in front of Sheridan’s tent, 1864. Left to right: Wesley Merritt, David McM.Gregg, Sheridan, Henry E. Davies (standing), James H. Wilson, and Alfred Torbert.

1864.

Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan and his generals in front of Sheridan’s tent, 1864. Left to right: Wesley Merritt, David McM.Gregg, Sheridan, Henry E. Davies (standing), James H. Wilson, and Alfred Torbert.

1864.
The four-tiered, 780-foot-long railroad trestle bridge built by Federal engineers at Whiteside, Tenn.

1864.

The four-tiered, 780-foot-long railroad trestle bridge built by Federal engineers at Whiteside, Tenn.

1864.
Soldiers at rest after drill, Petersburg VA.
The soldiers are seated reading letters and papers and playing cards.

1864.

Soldiers at rest after drill, Petersburg VA.

The soldiers are seated reading letters and papers and playing cards.

January 5th, 1864.
Army locations on this day.

January 5th, 1864.

Army locations on this day.

January 4th, 1864.
“The cold spell that had started the year continued, and was causing miseries across the Southern states, which were not used to such conditions even in good times of peace. After the depredations of four years of war and destruction, the suffering was intense. Even in the Army of Northern Virginia, the troops were in a bad way. Besides the cold, for which they lacked sufficient blankets and other clothing, they were getting severely short of food. Gen. Robert E. Lee had been sending increasingly plaintive telegrams to Jefferson Davis, pleading for additional rations to be sent. Davis, who was genuinely distraught that he had none to send, became so upset about the situation today that he replied with a suggestion that he simply take it from the countryside. This was appealing to neither man, but “The emergency justifies impression…” Davis said.”

January 4th, 1864.

“The cold spell that had started the year continued, and was causing miseries across the Southern states, which were not used to such conditions even in good times of peace. After the depredations of four years of war and destruction, the suffering was intense. Even in the Army of Northern Virginia, the troops were in a bad way. Besides the cold, for which they lacked sufficient blankets and other clothing, they were getting severely short of food. Gen. Robert E. Lee had been sending increasingly plaintive telegrams to Jefferson Davis, pleading for additional rations to be sent. Davis, who was genuinely distraught that he had none to send, became so upset about the situation today that he replied with a suggestion that he simply take it from the countryside. This was appealing to neither man, but “The emergency justifies impression…” Davis said.”

1864.
Log Hunt Company Kitchen.

1864.

Log Hunt Company Kitchen.

January 4th, 1864.
This New York Times editorial makes the argument that the question of the social status of black Americans need not be settled before reconstruction takes place. Reading it charitably, perhaps the writer would have been surprised to learn how long it would actually take.

 EQUALITY OF RACES IN THE SOUTH. Published: January 4, 1864
— We find by the report of the proceedings of the “Convention of the Friends of Freedom,” held in New-Orleans last month, that there was no little trouble caused by the admission of negroes to seats as delegates. A resolution was introduced upon the subject, but the Chair decided it to be out of order. Subsequently one of the delegations made the admission of colored men the ground of withdrawal. It is a great misfortune that at this moment there should be such causes of dissension introduced among the loyal men of the reclaimed Southern States. If the process of political reconstruction has to be delayed in all the rebel States that are successively brought within the military lines of the Union until such time as the social status of the various races is settled, we fear that the thing will not go on as rapidly as might be desired. It is true that if the settlement of this question were a necessity of reunion, no one could complain that it was brought forward and forced to a settlement. But such is not the case; and the whole Union might be reconstructed tomorrow with this question left in abeyance for such solution as might come from discussion, time and circumstance.
When the happy days arrive in which the “federation of the world” is a fixed fact, and the “parliament of man” holds its sessions, there will doubtless be representatives in the latter from every race and tribe that inhabit the globe, including Yankees, Hottentots, Celts, Sclaves, Tartars and Toltecs, and there will doubtless be a perfect fraternization between men of every color and cerebellum. But we fear that over the greater part of this continent there has not yet come even the dawning of that epoch; and that where, as in the South, there are two races of such different characteristics as the whites and blacks, who have been placed for centuries in such antagonistic political, social and moral circumstances, the attempt to raise, or reduce, them all to a common level in these respects, will neither be attended with present advantage nor permanent success.

January 4th, 1864.

This New York Times editorial makes the argument that the question of the social status of black Americans need not be settled before reconstruction takes place. Reading it charitably, perhaps the writer would have been surprised to learn how long it would actually take.


EQUALITY OF RACES IN THE SOUTH.
Published: January 4, 1864

— We find by the report of the proceedings of the “Convention of the Friends of Freedom,” held in New-Orleans last month, that there was no little trouble caused by the admission of negroes to seats as delegates. A resolution was introduced upon the subject, but the Chair decided it to be out of order. Subsequently one of the delegations made the admission of colored men the ground of withdrawal. It is a great misfortune that at this moment there should be such causes of dissension introduced among the loyal men of the reclaimed Southern States. If the process of political reconstruction has to be delayed in all the rebel States that are successively brought within the military lines of the Union until such time as the social status of the various races is settled, we fear that the thing will not go on as rapidly as might be desired. It is true that if the settlement of this question were a necessity of reunion, no one could complain that it was brought forward and forced to a settlement. But such is not the case; and the whole Union might be reconstructed tomorrow with this question left in abeyance for such solution as might come from discussion, time and circumstance.

When the happy days arrive in which the “federation of the world” is a fixed fact, and the “parliament of man” holds its sessions, there will doubtless be representatives in the latter from every race and tribe that inhabit the globe, including Yankees, Hottentots, Celts, Sclaves, Tartars and Toltecs, and there will doubtless be a perfect fraternization between men of every color and cerebellum. But we fear that over the greater part of this continent there has not yet come even the dawning of that epoch; and that where, as in the South, there are two races of such different characteristics as the whites and blacks, who have been placed for centuries in such antagonistic political, social and moral circumstances, the attempt to raise, or reduce, them all to a common level in these respects, will neither be attended with present advantage nor permanent success.